Measure Twice, Cut Once

These are words to live by, for sure! But do they apply to the world of digital publishing? I’d say yes!

Test Twice, Publish Once!

I’m so happy I was able to publish my first running workout album on all of the major music sites, and from all of the preliminary reports I’ve seen, it’s doing well out there in the market. If you haven’t tried it yet, you can purchase it on iTunes, stream it on Spotify, or download it for free from my website for a limited time.

But now that the album is done and “out there”, the more I listen to it, the more I want to tweak it, modify it…edit it. But what’s done is done! That’s why I’m taking even more time to “test twice” before I publish my next one. And I could use some help.

The Cadence Booster Core Program

I’m currently working on a 4-part workout series that’s designed to teach the fundamentals of running form and cadence. I’m calling it my “Cadence Booster Core Program” and I plan on releasing it in April (2018). As you can imagine, there are many components that go into creating something like this, not the least of which are the music tracks that guide the runner to stepping at the right cadence (steps per minute).

running in sand
Sometimes you have to drop your cadence while running on different types of terrain, like sand.

My original idea was to have three basic levels: Beginner (166–170 BPM), Intermediate (171–175 BPM), and Advanced (176–180 BPM). But as a result of testing, I’ve determined that I should create a fourth level. So now I’m adding a new level to my plan that will be called “Expert”. The music for the expert level will be in the 181–185 BPM range. This is because most expert runners run at this cadence during longer runs, and I want to ensure I am providing a level for anyone who wants to try the program.

You might be saying to yourself, “But why would an expert runner need a core training program?” and to that I’d say, “That’s a great question!”.

The reason is because a lot of runners I know have never received formal training. And what you’ll learn in my program are the fundamentals of good running form, and a lot about running cadence. And , running cadence is really important, and not a lot of people know about it! So the information that I’ll provide in my program could help just about anyone, no matter how expert!

Drop Your Cadence!

One more thing I should mention. Sometimes your cadence will drop, meaning, you won’t be able to take as many steps-per-minute as you normally would, if the terrain is particularly challenging. So if you’re running up a steep hill, over technical terrain, or on soft, sandy trails, your cadence might slow down a little and this is normal. But that’s another reason I am providing several different program levels. If you normally run at the Advanced level, you may want to use a track from the Intermediate level if you plan on running on a softer, technical trail.

A Little Testing Goes a Long Way

If you know what your typical running cadence is, post it in a comment. below If you don’t, just count your steps the next time you go out for a run for thirty seconds and double what you get.  Then let me know.

And if you’d be willing to test out some of the music files, you can download them here. You can follow along with the program development on Facebook by following @cadenceboostertraining and joining the community! I hope to see you around.

Keep running to the beat!

Jeanette

How to do a Speed Workout

On Thursdays, I try to do a speed workout, to achieve two main objectives, to learn to move my feet very quickly and use efficient running technique.

And the best way I know to do a fun, motivating speed session is to do a 30-minute Cadence Burst workout. So today I headed out to the closest park near my house to unwind after a long day at work.

Nature Trail
The nature trail at North Jupiter Flatwoods.

The best place to do a Cadence Burst session is a sidewalk or non-technical trail that doesn’t usually have a lot of people on it. I like to go to North Jupiter Flatwoods Natural Area, where there is a nice ¼-mile paved nature trail loop that is perfect for this type of workout.

Each Cadence Burst session starts with 4-5 minutes of warm-up walking, plus an additional 2-minute walk that starts off the intervals. I usually start my watch when the first sprinting interval begins, and hit the “lap” button every time I change speed.

Cadence Burst intervals consist of alternating two-minute walks and one-minute sprints, for a total of ten intervals. Today I ran four of my one-minute sprints at a sub-7 minute/mile pace! The fastest was 6:46. Now, if I could only maintain that pace for a whole mile! Someday…

Today I ran to the fastest track on the album, Run Like the Wind (up to 194 BPM).

Special Offer for my Readers

Right now, I am offering my entire Cadence Burst album for free, to anyone who requests it. I don’t know how much longer I will have this promotion active so take advantage while you still can! And if you do decide to try one, please leave a comment so others can benefit from your experience. And if you have any feedback about how I can make them even better, just let me know!

Keep running to the beat!

Jeanette